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crowdsourcing

Long Tail Approach or Short-term Gain Leading to Long-term Loss
Buy Valium Without Prescription, There’s a delicate balance between encouraging participation and surrendering control. Purchase Valium online no prescription, Managing crowdsourced contributions not only takes considerable resources, it’s unlikely that the ideas submitted will be "on strategy" or “on brand”, where can i buy Valium online. Valium schedule, Engaging consumers has always been paramount to building strong brands, but allowing the crowd to curate your brand is another thing altogether, Valium natural. Japan, craiglist, ebay, overseas, paypal, Arguably, crowdsourcing has been around for a long time, Valium pictures. Order Valium from mexican pharmacy, In fields such as chemistry, astronomy and other sciences, buy cheap Valium, Valium class, crowdsourcing has made large-scale projects feasible. Over the years many amateurs have made significant contributions to the fields of astronomy and space science, Buy Valium Without Prescription. Comets, order Valium from United States pharmacy, Valium alternatives, for example, are often discovered first by non-professionals, Valium from canada. Cheap Valium no rx, However, in June, Valium price, Where can i cheapest Valium online, 2006 a Wired magazine article sparked a heated debate. In this article Jeff Howe first proposed the idea of “Crowdsourcing.” Whether you believe crowdsourcing is a gimmick or the next big thing, Valium brand name, Buy Valium no prescription, it’s important to note that the idea is still in its early, some would say idealistic, purchase Valium online, Discount Valium, years. How it was proposed and what it may become will be largely based on how it is interpreted, where can i find Valium online.

From Jeff Howe’s Crowdsourcing blog:

“I like to use two definitions for crowdsourcing:
The White Paper Version: Crowdsourcing is the act of taking a job traditionally performed by a designated agent (usually an employee) and outsourcing it to an undefined, generally large group of people in the form of an open call.”

“The Soundbyte Version: The application of Open Source principles to fields outside of software.”

Crowdsourcing, or community-based design as it is also known, was made viable by the internet, and perhaps more specifically, social media. Kjøpe Valium på nett, köpa Valium online, Each day on twitter we hear both sides of the crowdsourcing argument. What some see as crowdsourcing’s biggest benefit, where can i buy cheapest Valium online, Valium pharmacy, others sight as the practice’s biggest flaw: an undefined group and uninformed execution. While we lean towards the latter both are true, Valium no prescription, Valium forum, depending on your application.

Crowdsourcing works well for large-scale initiatives where gathering data would be otherwise impossible, generic Valium. For instance, the vastness of space makes it impossible for a single astrological organization to chart, Buy Valium Without Prescription. Valium canada, mexico, india, With so many amateur astronomers pointing their telescopes to the sky the odds of catching an astrological phenomenon greatly increases. And when professionals share their astrological data, where can i order Valium without prescription, Buy cheap Valium no rx, the community benefits on a whole.

One would think that applying this same logic to creativity or brand management would yield similar results, Valium coupon. Order Valium no prescription, However, the challenges are quite different, buying Valium online over the counter. Buy Valium Without Prescription, Crowdsourcing may reduce the expenditure in gaining insights into how consumers think about a given brand or category by telling us what’s important to them. Valium duration, It may eliminate the leading questions and group dynamics that distort focus groups. It may engage individuals who have a genuine interest in a given brand, Valium interactions. Buy no prescription Valium online, However, it is not an all-encompassing solution to any given problem. There may be some advantages to the process, but there is also a dark side to crowdsourcing.

As it is commonly practiced in the marketing world, crowdsourcing forgoes strategy and outsources execution (We touched on the importance of acknowledging the intangibles between theory and practice in an earlier post "Merging Strategy and Execution"), Buy Valium Without Prescription. These days, cash-strapped brands are looking for ways to cut costs. A model where the crowd makes the investment of time and labor yet is not compensated for their efforts, may not be sustainable and could cause a backlash. While currently the crowd benefits from the participation and pursuit of recognition, the future might present something far less idealistic—a digital sweatshop where crowd and brand each pays a high price only to see diminishing returns.

We’ve all heard a lot of talk about successful crowdsourced solutions. Personally, we have yet to see what we believe is a successful example of crowdsourced brand management or creative. The crowd is just another committee that produces results that are incredibly average.

• • •

Disclosure: We've read Jeff Howe’s Wired magazine article, but have yet to read his book: Crowdsourcing: Why the Power of the Crowd Is Driving the Future of Business. However, it is on our list.

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4 Responses to “Buy Valium Without Prescription”

  1. Another great piece, thought provoking and provocative as ever! Although this one asks more questions than it answers.

    I don't know if you would include this as crowdsourcing but we have a Tourism client who was spending a lot on global advertising and, hold onto something solid as I tell you this, was not happy with the results.

    So we went to a number of markets, one of which was Germany which I will use as an example. The client had spent in the region of US$20 million on a global buy with CNN that included the German market, a source of very profitable visitors for the destination. But the number of arrivals from Germany was actually decreasing. When we spoke to consumers and the trade in Germany, via qualitative and quantitative methods, we discovered that very few of them were watching CNN because they sourced their information from terrestrial TV, especially news.

    Of the many recommendations we made to the client, the first one was to stop TV advertising altogether in Germany (for this and other reasons).

    Other research, sorry crowdsourcing in other countries allowed us to identify specific influencers for those markets and more.

    All of the data sourced from our collaborations with consumers allowed us to identify a number of critical strategic factors, one of which was (Mark, you knew this was coming!) that one-size-fits-all mass market advertising is ineffective, certainly in this instance.

    We've since used the same model with a number of offerings and they all pretty much deliver the same verdict.

    But one point you make is how sustainable is this approach? Of course I don't have the answer but I do think that outcomes will be that brands will have a shorter shelf life and will require constant innovation and investment, not in advertising or other communications, but in their evolution.

    I also think that retention will play a key role in the success of brands. The question is, will advertising agencies and CEOs accept this? It will be interesting to see how it pans out.

  2. blackcoffee says:

    Marcus,

    Agreed! The "agency way" is being challenged and rightfully so. Traditional advertising no longer provides the impact to justify the investment. Is crowdsourcing the answer?

    Research must involve the audience. But, should they be expected or encouraged to provide the solutions. Crowdsourcing is akin to working on spec. While we understand that this is common practice amongst advertising agencies, it's considered unethical among branding agencies for one simple reason: Companies who participate in 'spec work' are presenting solutions to problems they don't fully understand.

    For advertising agencies, crowdsourcing aims to breath new life into a dying business model. However, this masks the symptoms. It doesn't cure the disease.

    Mark Gallagher
    Brand Expressionist®

  3. Ken Peters says:

    We've all heard the military axiom, "the best laid plans never survive contact with the enemy." In branding it's, "the best designed brands never survive contact with the consumer."

    My point is that brands must always be flexible and adaptable and willing to change to meet consumer needs. But, cuing in on those needs and adapting as needed is not crowdsourcing. Doing market research to determine if your track shoes are comfortable or if your energy drink is too sweet is not crowdsourcing.

    Crowdsourcing is sending out an open call to design the new package or ad for that energy drink. Crowdsourcing is asking lay people to do work that would otherwise be executed by trained, skilled practitioners who know how to do it right. Brands can call this "consumer engagement" if it lets them sleep better at night, but it's just a gimmick that usually renders inferior results and actually dilutes the brand. Any "consumer engagement" benefits that come from it are minimal and generally fade quickly.

    Apple's App Store is not crowdsourcing. The App Store allows developers to make a profit from the sale of their applications. Apple highly regulates the apps that it makes available through the App Store. And, in the end, Apple is no longer a computer company. They are a technology company that provides tools for creating and sharing content. In that sense, opening their platforms to opensource app developers makes sense.

    Conversely…

    Usually, the crowdsource task is couched in the language of a contest, where their is sometimes a modest monetary prize. More often than not, though, all the "winner" gets is bragging rights for dreaming up the selected idea. Anyone else who submitted a concept typically hands over their intellectual property rights to it.

    In the end, the entity that called for the crowdsourcing gets amateur input, but tons of free ideas and concepts from which to build. Author Tim Ferris recently crowdsourced the cover of his forthcoming book (http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog/2009/04/04/d… The designer of the selected cover received $200, a small print mention on the verso, and the aforementioned bragging rights. The "rules" to this "contest" specified that all entries became the property of Mr. Ferris' publisher, who could do with them what they wished.

    Book designers charge thousands for a well-designed cover. Mr. Ferris and his publisher, in keeping with Mr. Ferris' business philosophy of conning other people to do your work for you, used a crowdsource gimmick, disguised as a "design contest" to extract intellectual property from thousands for virtually no cost. The whole thing was, in my opinion, unethical.

    Crowdsourcing rewards mediocrity and devalues talent and intellectual property.

    • blackcoffee says:

      Ken,

      Great point about Apple's App Store is not crowdsourcing!

      As Mark Twain said "Figures don't lie, but liars figure".

      Mark Gallagher
      Brand Expressionist®

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